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148 search results found for search term "physiotherapy exercise"

Young alumni stories: The grad, the engineer and the sports star

Enjoy multitasking? That’s nothing for Kassia Ralston, who was an international water polo player and Western Australian Institute of Sport scholarship athlete for the duration of her civil and construction engineering degree. Imagine training up to four hours a day, almost every day, for five years. It’s a rigorous routine that many elite athletes face, but for Kassia Ralston – a former member of the Australian Junior and Senior Women’s Water…

What’s the secret to job satisfaction?

You spend half your adult life at work, so shouldn’t it be as enjoyable an experience as possible? New research has looked at what makes happy workers and how we can improve job satisfaction. Are you satisfied with your job? If not, you’re not alone. According to a recent survey, West Australians are feeling the lowest levels of job satisfaction in the country. So why aren’t West Aussies feeling the workplace love? And can we do better? I spoke…

Young alumni stories: Four weeks on the high seas

One ship, four weeks, 240 guests from 11 countries, a dawn-to-dusk schedule, a tiny cabin shared with two roommates, one day off a fortnight and absolutely no internet. That’s the Ship for World Youth experience Master of Public Health student Jordina Quain signed up for in what she describes as a ‘a once in a life-time opportunity’. Ship for World Youth (SWY) is an international exchange program funded by the Japanese government, which aims to…

New research shows community care clients enjoy preventative exercises

Trained community care workers are able to safely incorporate a falls prevention exercise program into their existing services for older clients, new research by Curtin University has found. The paper, published in the journal Clinical Interventions in Aging today, examined the feasibility of 25 community care workers across Western Australia delivering falls prevention exercise programs to older clients, either at low or medium risk of falling…

Sisters who study together, succeed together

Growing up playing netball, basketball and tennis, sometimes all on the same day, it’s little wonder Port Hedland triplets Roberta, Lauren and Jacinta decided to become physiotherapists. The Ramirez-Smith sisters joined ten of their peers last night as the first cohort to graduate from the Indigenous Pre-Medicine and Health Sciences Enabling Course at Curtin. They are now set to begin their first year of an undergraduate degree in physiotherapy

Triplet sisters blaze a trail in first Indigenous enabling graduations

Trailblazing Indigenous female triplets are one step closer to achieving their dreams of becoming certified physiotherapists after graduating in the first cohort of a new enabling course at Curtin University. Lauren, Roberta and Jacinta Ramirez-Smith, aged 18, are among 13 graduates who have successfully completed the first Indigenous Pre-Medicine and Health Sciences Enabling Course at Curtin University. The course, run through the Centre for…

Fewer people being referred to fall prevention programs, new study says

More than half of older West Australians who reported falling over in the past year did not seek medical assistance, new Curtin University-led research has found, with a significant decline in the number of people being referred to prevention programs after a fall over the past decade. The research, published in Clinical Interventions in Aging today, compared the rate of falls among WA community care clients aged 65 and over between 2005 and…

Curtin appoints new head of Health Sciences

Curtin University has appointed Professor Archie Clements as its Pro Vice-Chancellor Health Sciences, commencing in April 2018. Professor Clements is currently Director of the Research School of Population Health and Professor of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra. The Research School of Population Health is comprised of five academic units, including the flagship National Centre for…

New research finds tablet device a potential risk for young children

The use of tablet devices among young children may increase the risk of neck, back and arm pain and reduce physical activity, new Curtin University research which recommends traditional toy play has found. The research, published in Applied Ergonomics, investigated the head, trunk and arm postures, muscle activity, sedentariness and physical activity of young children aged three to five years while using a tablet computer compared to watching…

New tool aims to help hospital stay of patients with dementia

Curtin University-led research has recommended a new communication tool to help the millions of people living with dementia who are admitted to hospital across the globe every year. The research, published in the international peer-reviewed journal Dementia, tested the feasibility of a new communication form that could be used by carers of people with dementia and hospital staff during a hospital visit. The form listed questions that covered a…