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Pushing the envelope

cite magazine
Issue 25 - Winter 2015

From the humble Lego set to unravelling the mysteries of our galaxy, Curtin University prides itself on teaching and research that’s collaborative, innovative, richly interactive, flexible and, above all, global. Here are a few examples.

Frontiers of Science

Through the development of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), a predecessor to the world’s largest radio telescope, Curtin astronomers are advancing our understanding of the Universe and fundamental physics. Projects of this scale require powerful data processing, and subsequently help progress the related fields of data visualisation and supercomputing.

One tile in a larger array making up the MWA radio telescope

One tile in a larger array making up the MWA radio telescope

The Pawsey Supercomputing Centre at Technology Park provides  the data processing that supports projects like the MWA.

The Pawsey Supercomputing Centre at Technology Park provides the data processing that supports projects like the MWA.

Transforming Learning

Curtin has redeveloped a number of its teaching and learning spaces with the goal to transform learning. These vibrant new spaces have been designed to increase student engagement, foster collaboration between staff and students, and provide flexible, technology-rich environments that support active student learning.

Teaching staff are embracing the ever- enduring Lego set as an engaging teaching tool.

Teaching staff are embracing the ever-enduring Lego set as an engaging teaching tool.

Nursing facilities at Curtin

Nursing students benefit from learning spaces that recreate hospital settings in amazing detail.

Empathy simulator, Jim the avatar

‘Jim’ the avatar helps healthcare students improve their patient interaction skills.

Professor Stelarc

Professor Stelarc’s Alternate Anatomies Lab explores issues of body enhancement.

Makerspace

The pop-up ‘makerspace’ at the library was a popular attraction during Curtin’s Festival of Learning in March, and is intended as a forerunner to a permanent makerspace – a collaborative learning environment that features cutting-edge technology and fosters an equitable, social and participatory style of learning.

A 3D printed object

The rapidly-evolving technology of 3D printing was demonstrated at the makerspace.

Demonstrating a 3D scanning app

Mobile devices provide an ideal platform for creativity and learning. This 3D scanning app for iPad is one example.

Get the picture?

As our capacity to process data grows, so too must our ability to explore, communicate and interact with that data. Curtin’s Hub for Immersive Visualisation and eResearch (HIVE) facility, with its four large-scale visualisation systems, was established to support this activity. Curtin is also recognised for expertise in building information modelling, whereby the physical characteristics of buildings are reproduced digitally, for construction and maintenance.

Inside Curtin’s Hub for Immersive Visualisation and eResearch (HIVE) facility

Inside Curtin’s Hub for Immersive Visualisation and eResearch (HIVE) facility

A digital generation of the internal structure of a building

Buildings are digitally generated and assessed using building information modelling techniques – a focus of Curtin’s School of Built Environment.

 

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