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“Fading Lights” immersive exhibition

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“Fading Lights” is a unique, immersive exhibition that showcases the experiences of Australians in Japan between 1945 and 1952.

Event details

Come along to an immersive digital visualisation exhibition about the experiences of Australians in Japan between 1945 and 1952.

Date
Thursday 6 August to Sunday 9 August 2015
Venue
John Curtin Gallery, Building 200A, Curtin University, Bentley, WA
Cost
Free
Dr Stuart Bender of Curtin University and Associate Professor Mick Broderick of Murdoch University, the two curators of "Fading Lights"
Dr Stuart Bender of Curtin University and Associate Professor Mick Broderick of Murdoch University, the two curators of "Fading Lights"

This digital visualisation exhibition coincides with the 70th anniversary of the bombings at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and highlights the commemoration of 100 years of ANZAC history, celebrated in 2015.

“Fading Lights” is curated by Dr Stuart Bender of Curtin University and Associate Professor Mick Broderick of Murdoch University. The exhibition uses high definition digital video to evoke the past and present sense of place at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and pays tribute to those who experienced this unique chapter of Australian and Japanese history.

The project will be showcased as an experimental, immersive exhibition at Curtin’s Hub for Immersive Visualisation and eResearch (HIVE) in association with the John Curtin Gallery from 6 to 9 August 2015.

You are welcome to come along to the opening night on 6 August from 5.45 pm to 7.30 pm at John Curtin Gallery. Please RSVP your attendance, any dietary requirements and any special requirements to events@curtin.edu.au.

For information about disability services at Curtin, please visit our Disability Services website.

More information can be found on the “Fading Lights” project website.

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