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Death threats, defamation and other demons: the perils of investigative journalism

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Corruption flourishes in society when journalists lack the nerve to shine a light on matters that the rich and powerful want to keep secret. Of course, this is often easier said than done.

Event details

Acclaimed investigative journalist, Kate McClymont, has witnessed first-hand what can happen to journalists when they dare to challenge corrupt politicians, questionable businessmen or underworld figures.

Date
Friday 11 September 2015
Time
5.15pm for 6.00pm start – 7.30pm
Venue
Norm Dufty Lecture Theatre Building 210:102
Cost
Please RSVP your attendance and any dietary requirements to events@curtin.edu.au by Friday 4 September 2015.
Photograph by James Alcock.

Acclaimed investigative journalist, Kate McClymont, has witnessed first-hand what can happen to journalists when they dare to challenge corrupt politicians, questionable businessmen or underworld figures.

It can get ugly, and lead to law suits, death threats and even blackmail.

Kate was once threatened by an organised crime figure. She says: “If I was a man, he would have broken my jaw.” This man had been charged with murder, attempted murder and five conspiracies to murder, and was acquitted of the lot.

She says: “Investigative journalists have to look on the bright side. The threats usually indicate we are on the right track. Journalists are society’s eyes and ears. We have a duty to not look the other way.”

Join Curtin University’s Department of Journalism and Kate McClymont for this important public lecture and hear first-hand the dangers that an investigative journalist can face.

About the speaker

Kate McClymont is an investigative journalist with the Sydney Morning Herald. She is a five-time winner of journalism’s most prestigious award, the Walkley, including the Gold Walkley for her coverage of the Sydney Bulldogs salary cap rorts.

Kate was named the 2012 NSW Journalist of the Year for her investigations into the fraudulent activities of Michael Williamson, the head of the Health Services Union, and the business activities of former NSW Labor minister, Eddie Obeid.