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Curtin’s lake to benefit from work by Indigenous community

Media release
A team of Indigenous people are working on rejuvenating the Jack Finney Lake on Curtin University of Technology’s Bentley Campus this week.
Curtin Parks and Gardens Manager, Mrs Allyson Mullane, said a group of about 15 people are carrying out gardening, sustainable horticulture and restoration work.
“We are pleased to work on this program which is an initiative of the IPA Employment Agency’s Indigenous Division,” Mrs Mullane said.
“The program is a way of providing job skills to Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander people and aims to boost their confidence to get back into the workforce,” she said.
Over three days, participants are pruning shrubs, mulching and working on sustainable gardening.
The “hands-on” program includes an induction to the workplace, safety rules and regulations, training in equipment handling, horticulture training, and mentoring support.
“This is a great opportunity for us to get the community more involved with our gardens,” Mrs Mullane said.
“The Jack Finney Lake is a significant icon as it is a focal point as people enter the main entrance. The flora, fauna and environs will benefit from the cleanup work.”
Curtin is dedicated to promoting an understanding of Indigenous culture, implementing strategies to increase participation of Indigenous people in higher education, and continuing a commitment to fostering partnerships in Indigenous research and development.
This time last year Curtin was the first Australian university to launch a Reconciliation Action Plan, and 2009 is the 11th anniversary of Curtin’s original Statement of Reconciliation and Commitment.

A team of Indigenous people are working on rejuvenating the Jack Finney Lake on Curtin University of Technology’s Bentley Campus this week.

Curtin Parks and Gardens Manager, Mrs Allyson Mullane, said a group of about 15 people are carrying out gardening, sustainable horticulture and restoration work.

“We are pleased to work on this program which is an initiative of the IPA Employment Agency’s Indigenous Division,” Mrs Mullane said.

“The program is a way of providing job skills to Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander people and aims to boost their confidence to get back into the workforce,” she said.

Over three days, participants are pruning shrubs, mulching and working on sustainable gardening.

The “hands-on” program includes an induction to the workplace, safety rules and regulations, training in equipment handling, horticulture training, and mentoring support.

“This is a great opportunity for us to get the community more involved with our gardens,” Mrs Mullane said.

“The Jack Finney Lake is a significant icon as it is a focal point as people enter the main entrance. The flora, fauna and environs will benefit from the cleanup work.”

Curtin is dedicated to promoting an understanding of Indigenous culture, implementing strategies to increase participation of Indigenous people in higher education, and continuing a commitment to fostering partnerships in Indigenous research and development.

This time last year Curtin was the first Australian university to launch a Reconciliation Action Plan, and 2009 is the 11th anniversary of Curtin’s original Statement of Reconciliation and Commitment.