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Design concept helps local Indigenous youth

Media release

The design of an interior space to help reconnect Indigenous teenage girls to their culture has won Curtin University student Sheridan Emby a commendation at the recent WA Design Institute of Australia Awards.

The Interior Architecture student was given a brief to design a space for former AFL Eagles player David Wirrpanda’s Dare to Dream program.

The fourth year student said the interior design responded to the needs of spiritually homeless teenagers.

“Currently there is not a facility to accommodate this community program. The brief I was given was to design a space to occupy the Moore’s heritage-listed building in Fremantle,” Sheridan said.

“The main aim of the space is to form a sense of belonging and identity with their community.”

Sheridan’s design includes a multifunctional performance space, exhibition and healthy lifestyle area, as well as an outdoor kitchen facility, art studio and recreational breakout zones.

“My design guides the users through a series of spaces which helps young girls reconnect with their Indigenous culture, allowing them to form and express their own identity,” she said.

“It provides areas where they can reflect on these two experiences and gain life skills to help pursue their dreams.

“The way the users move through the space is paramount and influential to the success of the program, therefore the layout emphasises the design concept of journey, reconnection, reflection and identity formation.”

Professor Peter Davis, Curtin’s Head of the School of Built Environment said it’s great to see students getting recognised for their hard work.

“Sheridan is a talented designer. She has worked hard and deserves this recognition,” Professor Davis said.

The WA Design Institute of Australia Awards is an annual event which recognises and acknowledges the achievements of WA designers. Awards are given to both professional and student designers.

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