Skip to main content

Public health work reaps awards

Media release

Curtin University health advocate Professor Mike Daube has been awarded two prestigious national awards for his work.

Professor Daube, Professor of Health Policy at Curtin was last night awarded the 2011 Sidney Sax Public Health Medal, awarded by the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA).

He has also been awarded the National Heart Foundation’s Kempson Maddox Award. Only 10 of these awards have been awarded by the Heart Foundation.

The Sidney Sax Public Health Medal award is awarded to a person who has provided a notable contribution to the protection and promotion of public health.

Professor Jill Downie, Pro Vice-Chancellor, Health Sciences at Curtin, congratulated Professor Daube on his outstanding achievement.

“Professor Daube’s dedication to the field of public health serves as an inspiration to our students and to the wider community. His work demonstrates that an individual can make a difference to the health and wellbeing of others,” she said.

Professor Helen Keleher, PHAA President, said Professor Daube had made an enormous contribution to the health field and his work had made significant changes to the industry.

 “Professor Daube has made an enormous contribution to improving the health of Australians and is a very worthy recipient of the Sidney Sax Medal,” Professor Keleher said.

The Kempson Maddox Award is awarded to give recognition of individuals for meritorious service and contribution to the aims and objectives of the National Heart Foundation of Australia.

Dr Lyn Roberts, National CEO of the Heart Foundation, said Professor Daube was a very worthy recipient of the award, and an inspiring leader. 

“He is a strong and enduring advocate for reducing the suffering and death from heart disease in Australia and his commitment to this aim is exemplary,” Dr Roberts said. 

Professor Daube, who is Director of the Public Health Advocacy Institute and the McCusker Centre for Action on Alcohol and Youth said it was rewarding to receive this recognition from organisations that have contributed so much to the health of all Australians. 

“It is a privilege to work in public health, where so many people work so hard for the benefit of the community,” Professor Daube said.

Notes to editors:

The Sidney Sax award is named after Dr Sidney Sax, who is considered Australia’s first health planner and was a major leader in public health, health service reform and establishing innovative research.

Sir John Kempson Maddox was a highly respected Sydney cardiologist who was responsible for establishing the Australasian Cardiac Society in 1951 and the National Heart Foundation of Australia in 1958.  The Heart Foundation introduced the Kempson Maddox Award in August 1995 in his honour.

Contacts:

Teresa Belcher / Kristy Jones, Public Relations, Curtin University
Tel: 08 9266 9085, Email: teresa.belcher@curtin.edu.au / k.jones@curtin.edu.au

Professor Mike Daube, Public Health Advocacy Institute, Health Sciences Faculty Office Tel: 0409 933 933, Email: m.daube@curtin.edu.au

Web: http://curtin.edu.au